In two cases involving CNN IBN-Cobrapost and the ToI, the judiciary took 10 and 20 years respectively to decide cases of civil and criminal defamation.
…the problem for journalists is that it can be used against them when public figures and celebrities want to stop media scrutiny
Although the judgment has declined to find newspaper managements guilty of contempt, it has settled 4 questions of law which will have far reaching implications for journalists and newspapers in India.
BY PRASHANT THIKKAVARAPU| IN JUDGEMENTS |06/06/2017
A High Court judge says an apology for defamation is often better than damages. The argument is intriguing, but flawed.
Justice Endlaw fell back on a far-reaching principle rather than jurisdiction to dismiss the case before him,
It falls for the specious arguments put forward for a media gag by three lawyers accused of sexual harassment.
But the case shows how contempt is misused by the courts to crush critical reports quickly while the final ruling takes years to come.
In their Udta Punjab and Perumal Murugan rulings, the courts missed an opportunity to lay down some fundamental principles
IN JUDGEMENTS |21/06/2016
Twenty-two years…18 years…that is how long the courts take to settle defamation cases which are becoming increasingly routine and frivolous.
The central flaw in Justice Dipak Misra’s criminal defamation ruling is equating right to reputation with right to free speech as a fundamental right.
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The Bombay High Court has extended  the stay order on investigation into the case against Quint journalist Poonam Agarwal on charges of OSA and abetment to suicide of jawan Roy Matthew following her sting exposing the exploitative sahayak system. A bench comprising Justices Naresh Patil and Nitin Sambre said the next date of the hearing would be Jan 16, 2018.                                                                     

News18 reports  hat The JNU administration has asked student activist Shehla Rashid to appear for a proctoral inquiry over her claims on Twitter about "Internet censorship" on the campus. Rashid, a former JNU students' union vice president, had tweeted on November 11 that students were unable to access content from AIB, The Wire, NDTV, and YouTube videos related to student movements, and that certain keyword searches related to Mamata Bannerjee, Rahul Gandhi, and others were censored.  Rashid has said she will not appear for the enquiry since the JNU administration has no jurisdiction over her tweets.

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