BY ANJALI PURI| IN ARCHIVE |18/11/2016
On November 18, 2010 the Radia tapes emerged. On the sixth anniversary of the scandal we republish a memorable series on PR from The Hoot.
BY ANJALI PURI| IN ARCHIVE |05/11/2016
All the hapless viewer knows as she glides from gadget PR to corporate golf PR to tell-me-your-company’s- success-story PR…is that when TV doesn’t roar, it purrs.
BY ANJALI PURI| IN ARCHIVE |05/11/2016
Well-spoken executives offering well-packaged stories also came in to pitch for new players who needed to build profiles, influence policy and defuse criticism.
BY Sumegha Gulati| IN ARCHIVE |30/07/2016
And then, I ran. Not because I wanted to shirk off my journalistic duties but because no story is worth a life.
BY AJITH PILLAI| IN ARCHIVE |30/04/2016
A Hoot Retrospective from 2013: Tourism in Rome, Milan and Sicily will get a boost as Indian investigators shop for insights into the chopper deal.
BY SEVANTI NNAN| IN ARCHIVE |21/03/2016
As the December 13, 2001 Parliament attack accused S AR Geelani is acquitted by the High Court, it is instructive to revisit the reporting on his case,
BY ANJALI PURI| IN ARCHIVE |25/09/2012
A HOOT SPECIAL REPORT-close to two years after the Radia tapes emerged, media management remains a hardy industry.
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Both Barkha Dutt and NDTV announced on Sunday that she will moving on from the channel to do her own thing.  While she said,"It's been a super ride at NDTV but new beginning in 2017. I shall be moving on from NDTV to explore new opportunities and my own ventures," the channel she joined out of college and spent 21 years with issued a generous statement. It said, "In all her years with NDTV, she has been hugely productive and has grown with the organisation, becoming an acclaimed, award-winning journalist of repute...We are certain that Barkha will go from strength to strength and NDTV wishes her all the very best." Will the channel feel the same without her?

Is getting political gossip paramount for political reporters? It  seems to override all other considerations, going by an item in Jan 13's Indian Express column `Delhi Confidential'.  Journalists, including seniors, apparently throng Congress leader Sajjan Kumar's annual lunch for his insights into Haryana, UP and Delhi politics. Any journalist worth her salt knows that he faces criminal cases for his alleged involvement in the November 1984  massacre of Sikhs in Delhi. He was denied a Lok Sabha ticket in 2009 because of this, despite having won in 2004. Should journalists patronise a politician accused of such a crime?  Accepting his hospitality is one thing, interviewing him for his insights is another.            

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