IT policy reporting fellowships on The Hoot

IN Opportunities | 20/12/2016
The Hoot is offering short term reporting fellowships for journalists covering the Information Technology and Communication beats.

 

The Hoot is offering short term fellowships for journalists covering the Department of Information Technology  and  the Communication Ministry. They will be expected  to research and report on policy evolution in the area of regulating online free speech, tackling cyber security, and examine the challenges of regulating social media.

If the Information Technology Act of 2000 is being updated as has been reported, what are the concerns being tackled?

Journalists from English, Hindi and regional media are invited to apply with specific short term research proposals in the following areas.

  • The making of policy to govern social media and the updating of existing laws which cover information technology.
  • How will the inherent tension between free speech absolutism and regulation to provide a safe space online, be dealt with? Is the government liaising with industry on this issue, and on tackling intermediary liability?
  • How are government and industry working together to identify measures and steps to curb hate speech and harassment?
  • Which are  the areas which the current law does not cover, which need to be brought under its purview?

Fellows will be expected to talk to officials and experts within and outside government,  to reflect the concerns of government, regulatory bodies, social media platforms, and civil society in the above areas, and produce reporting and analysis for the media outlet they work for. Their reports will also be carried on The Hoot.

Those interested may apply with a specific proposal on what they intend to research and report on.  The fellowship amount is not fixed, it will range from Rs 60,000 to 80,000 depending on the time taken and quantum of output agreed upon.  The number of fellowships given will depend on the quality of proposals received.

Please apply with a proposal and your name, work experience, place of work, current reporting beat, and a reference. Please provide links to your reporting on these issues.

Send  to editor@thehoot.org.

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