Media Resources For Readers For Journalists For Journalism Students Media Statistics Statistics Legal
Development Reporting Media Activism Media and Disability Media and Gender Media Diversity Privacy
WHAT THEY ARE SAYING ABOUT
WRITE FOR US!
The Hoot welcomes articles, letters, reviews and comments from readers and fellow journalists.
Please send your submission to
editor@thehoot.org
SUBSCRIBE TO THE NEWSLETTER
 


Prometheus Radio Project in Philadelphia empowers local voices and movements for social change.

The long fight for low power FM in the US
In India people don't have as much free time to do something like voluntarism and there's more of a culture around radio being a very serious business. It's not something fun,   PETE TRIDISH, founder of the Prometheus Radio Project, tells KANCHAN K. MALIK and VINOD PAVARALA. Pix: Pete Tridish 
A blow for free speech
In an impressive judgement, the Supreme Court has protected free speech by striking down Section 66A of the IT Act.   PRASHANT R THIKKAVARAPU explains the reasoning behind it. (Pix: left: Nariman; right: Chelameswar). 
Arnab Goswami, a bit of balance please
His big, brash cocktail of news and views packs a punch and he highlights issues other channels ignore, but Goswami's Newshour can do with some nuance.   VIKRAM JOHRI on TV's biggest bully. Pix: Times Now's hawkish stance. 
Wrong, crass, tasteless
Arnab Goswami's diatribe against the Indian cricket team led to a Twitter backlash.   DIPU SHAW reports on the #ShameOnTimesNow revolt against the anchor. Pix: Dhoni addressing the media on March 26. 
Poor ethics not just an Indian problem
Shady practices blight the media not just in India but in many other countries, says a new study.   ABHISHEK CHOUDHARY reports on the findings. 
What next for the section 66A cases?
For a law that was just barely four years old, it was an extraordinary unleashing of police powers against a range of ordinary users of the Internet.   GEETA SESHU says the process had become the punishment. Pix: India Today's coverage 
Masarat Alam's release: different tunes
The tone of the edits of most Delhi papers evoked nationalism, while the dailies published from J&K had a remarkably different pro-Sayeed, anti-Centre tone.   ABHISHEK CHOUDHARY tracks the media divide on this issue (Pix: The Times of India article on March 10). 
Shrinking spaces for dissent
The democratic set-up has opposition, but when it comes to dissent, democracy and dictatorships equally dislike them. Dissent revives, in a way, when space shrinks.   The B. G. Verghese Memorial Lecture by GOPALKRISHNA GANDHI. Pix: Gopal Gandhi. 
The rot in the media
The media has plunged into infamy in recent years because of paid news at election time and journalists working as the paid agents of corporations.   PRANATI MEHRA gives an overview. Pix: paid news 
Can guidelines prevent misuse of bad laws?
As two recent incidents show, guidelines for Sec 66 A of the IT Act and now, for sedition, are scant protection.   The law itself is flawed, says GEETA SESHU. Pix: Azam Khan 

Other recent stories
MEDIA WATCH BRIEFS
On March 29 Al Jazeera had a ten-minute coverage on The Indian media's rural blind spot: it contained figures from small surveys, such as the monthly coverage of rural India on the first page of Hindi and English papers (1.4 % for Hindu in Dec. 2014; zero for rest) and channels (6.6% for Aaj Tak in Dec. 2014; almost zero for most English channels). The report had usual suspects—P. Sainath; Gaon Connection; Khabar Lahariya; except for Rajdeep Sardesai, who conceded, “Let me be honest: the business model of Television today is struggling to try and plough back investment in business…”
Today was India Today’s turn to get castigated on social media (#ShameOnIndiaToday) – and deservedly so: this was after the magazine’s website posted a video with caption “Deepika or Kim Kardashian who’s your choice for a one night stand”. India Today took down the article and offered an apology, “Dear readers, we made a mistake. We are sorry,” though the URL still contains the same caption. 
Soon after India lost to Australia in the World Cup today, Headlines Today showed images of people lined up somewhere in India with one among them throwing down a television set in presumed disgust. Rajdeep Sardesai even wondered "if they were second-hand" because the cameras were around. A similar thing had happened in Pakistan when that country had lost. If this is done for the cameras who initiates it?  The 'angry' who want their moment of fame on TV or the TV crews looking for action?
Download The Hoot app:
   For Ipad
   For Android SmartPhone
   For Android tablet

FOLLOW US
MEDIA JOB OF THE WEEK
The Press Trust of India Ltd (PTI) is looking for experienced journalists for editorial positions at its Business Desk in New Delhi. Required Experience: 4-8 ye
Orissa Post Requires Senior Sub-Editor in Bhubaneswar: Orissa Post is looking for a Senior Sub Editor in Bhubaneswar. Required Experience: Minimum 5 years of ed
POLL
Does India need an independent and autonomous public broadcaster?
Yes
No
Cannot say
Copyright2011. THE HOOT. All Rights Reserved.