INDIA’S FREE SPEECH CHALLENGES—Part I. Films, television and public events ran into deletions and protests from a whole range of perpetrators in the last 15 months.
Will the breach of privilege case and the challenge before the Supreme Court outlive dissolution of the UP Assembly?
BY ANKITA PANDEY| IN SPECIAL REPORTS |20/12/2016
What are the factors that decide whether and where tribal language publications flourish? Some of the answers are surprising.
BY ANJALI PURI| IN ARCHIVE |05/11/2016
Well-spoken executives offering well-packaged stories also came in to pitch for new players who needed to build profiles, influence policy and defuse criticism.
IN SPECIAL REPORTS |25/05/2016
The Indian government should repeal or amend both recent and colonial era laws that are used to criminalize peaceful expression.
BY THE HOOT| IN MEDIA FREEDOM |03/05/2016
All over India, journalists at the district level are vulnerable but things are worst in Chhattisgarh, Uttar Pradesh and Tamil Nadu.
IN SPECIAL REPORTS |05/04/2016
The first quarter has seen not just censorship but violence, sedition and defamation cases, arrests and a murder
BY SAI VINOD| IN SPECIAL REPORTS |04/02/2016
Sardar Patel is energetically memorialized by this government, Ambedkar embraced, and Nehru snubbed,
BY NANDITA JHA| IN SPECIAL REPORTS |21/01/2016
Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu and Karnataka are the states which registered the most free speech related cases in 2015.
IN SPECIAL REPORTS |31/12/2015
Eight deaths, 30 attacks, 48 cases of defamation, 14 of sedition—its been grim year for free speech in India.
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Arnab Goswami's Newshour episodes of last summer have come under the scrutiny of of the UK broadcast regulator, Ofcom. Times Global is a licensee in the UK because its channel is shown there. This  long, civil post mortem of 19 episodes in August and September of Newshour viewed by the regulator holds them  in breach of one of its rules which require adequate alternative viewpoints to be provided. Several instances of Goswami's fulminations against Pakistan's government are cited. One of the pleas made in its own defence by the broadcaster was that the presenter had left the channel and had been replaced by one who had "a very different approach". (indiantelevision.com)                                           

ET Now is reported to have started a process of laying off employees, and plans to replace them with free lancers. Eight people in the Delhi bureau were given pink slips last week and some in smaller bureaus. These are at the desk, and also include cameramen and OB van personnel.                         

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Wednesday, April 19, 2017