BY SMARIKA KUMAR| IN LAW AND POLICY |28/05/2016
It tries to make its earlier ruling more nuanced by proposing three models of zero-rating without discriminatory tariffs.
BY JYOTI PUNWANI| IN OPINION |23/05/2016
If the media’s drought coverage had been relentless, it would have forced governments to act. By being sporadic, it failed to impact.
BY SHUMA RAHA| IN DIGITAL MEDIA |09/05/2016
In the mostly one-way information super highway built by this govt. there is little room for doubts or questions.
BY ANAND VARDHAN| IN OPINION |21/05/2016
Why does the media not question this antiquated ritual irrelevant to modern India rather than glorifying it with uncritical coverage?
Sections of the media failed to see the BJP wave and made the mistake of over-estimating the role of AIUDF’s Ajmal.
As two TV journalists in Kolkata come to blows over a story, it shows how feral the fight to be ‘first’ has become.
BY SHYAM G. MENON| IN OPINION |26/05/2016
What can an evolved, fifty-something journalist do with his experience when the media has evolved too and cannot accommodate him?
BY SEVANTI NINAN| IN MEDIA PRACTICE |19/05/2016
Does goondagiri and corruption loom much larger for journalists than it does for voters? Is that why they missed the Mamata sweep,
IN SPECIAL REPORTS |25/05/2016
The Indian government should repeal or amend both recent and colonial era laws that are used to criminalize peaceful expression.
The central flaw in Justice Dipak Misra’s criminal defamation ruling is equating right to reputation with right to free speech as a fundamental right.
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Independent journalist Rana Ayyub  launched her self-published book,"Gujarat Files, Anatomy of a Cover Up"  in Delhi on May 27. It  is an account of her undercover investigation of those culpable in the Gujarat 2002 riots.  Ayyub said that when she came back with the sting after eight months, a senior editor at  Tehelka (where  she worked) dismissed it as the stuff of  coffee table books. She was later told to destroy the tapes. Other publications whose editors she subsequently met also declined to publish these stories. She had this advice for journalism schools: don't teach young, aspiring journalists about ethics and justice.  Better to prepare them for stories getting dropped because  of political pressure. 

 

On the government’s big day it was amusing to watch the DD News anchor prompting two carefully picked panelists during a discussion on the government’s performance. If one of them said that exports were down, the anchor would quickly butt in, “because of global contraction”.  If  the panelist from Deccan Herald gushed about the PM having brought  new energy into governance, the anchor would prompt, “do you think it is because of his style of functioning?” And only on DD will a reporter presenting a report on one year of the farm channel mouth a line like “There is no doubt that DD Kisan will go long way.”   

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Thomson Reuters
Tuesday, May 24, 2016
Thomson Reuters
Tuesday, May 24, 2016